College of Fine Arts News Archive

October 2020

  • SFA School of Theatre to present ‘Rideshare/Overshare’

    SFA School of Theatre to present ‘Rideshare/Overshare’

    October 23, 2020—Robbie Goodrich

    Angela Bacarisse had been looking forward to directing “The Fantasticks” as part of the Mainstage Series this fall for the School of the Theatre at Stephen F. Austin State University.

    The theatre professor had eagerly anticipated the casting, costuming and scenic designs for the funny, romantic musical about the love between a boy and a girl amidst the meddling of their two fathers.

    Then came COVID-19.

    “I was really excited to do ‘The Fantasticks,’ but after looking at all the studies and talking to the music faculty, it was going to be really hard to work safely on music – teaching singing techniques to non-musicians wearing masks,” Bacarisse said, … not to mention trying to perfect the unique performance skills musicals require.

    Bacarisse had the script for “Rideshare/Overshare” in her cache of potential scripts for the School of Theatre’s biennial trip to Scotland for the Festival Fringe. She thought it would be well-suited for her theatre students to tour at the festival “because it can be produced very simply,” she said.

    There were a number of reasons why “Rideshare/Overshare” was brought into the Mainstage Series to replace “The Fantasticks.” The College of Fine Arts and School of Theatre no longer had access to Turner Auditorium in the Griffith Fine Arts Building because of a planned renovation/construction project that will take two years to complete. As a result, Kennedy Auditorium has become the main performance space for theatre students, and technical aspects need to be kept at a minimum because of facility limitations. Additionally, “Rideshare/Overshare” has the same number of cast members as “The Fantasticks,” so it just made sense to make the lineup switch.

    By Ian McWethy and Carrie McCrossen, “Rideshare/Overshare” is a play about Mike and Elaine, a young couple heading to meet each other on a blind date. They each decide independently to take an UBER to get there, and then they find themselves paired with the weirdest drivers on the road.

    “Their various experiences with drivers is what brings humor and pathos to the story,” Bacarisse said.

    The ensemble for “Rideshare/Overshare” plays multiple characters, so students will need to create distinct differences in each of the roles they take on, Bacarisse said adding that creates a special challenge for her in “keeping track of who is on stage and what character they are currently playing!”

    “It all takes place in cars, so there will be a need to keep the action interesting and the audience focused on what the characters are saying and experiencing,” she said.

    Bacarisse said the play is for ages approximately 10 and up, “simply because younger kids probably won’t find it interesting.”

    She further described “Rideshare/Overshare” as “just a nice story with some quirky folks inhabiting it.” The play will be presented at 7:30 nightly Tuesday through Saturday, Nov. 10 through 14, in Kennedy Auditorium on the SFA campus. It will also be livestreamed.

    “I hope people get a chance to come out and enjoy some live theatre, or they can stay in and enjoy a live performance on YouTube,” she added.

    Because of social distancing requirements, seating in Kennedy Auditorium will be limited for each performance. Patrons are required to wear face coverings. Actors on stage will wear masks during live performances.

    General ticket prices are: adult, $15; senior (62+), $10; non-SFA student, $10; SFA faculty/staff, $7.50; youth, $7.50; SFA student, $5; virtual access, $15. Live virtual access is available for all performances. Purchase tickets/access at boxoffice.sfasu.edu or call (936) 468-6407. For questions about the play, contact the School of Theatre at (936) 468-4003.

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  • SFA School of Theatre to present student-directed ‘The Bald Soprano’

    SFA School of Theatre to present student-directed ‘The Bald Soprano’

    October 22, 2020—Robbie Goodrich

    The Stephen F. Austin State University School of Theatre will present the student-directed one-act play “The Bald Soprano” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 30, and at 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 31, in Regents Suite A in the Baker Pattillo Student Center on the SFA campus. The show will also be livestreamed.

    Directed by Sulphur Springs senior Kaitlyn McDearmont, “The Bald Soprano” is an absurdist play written by Eugène Ionesco. The storyline follows a proper English couple, the Smiths, who are sharing an evening with the Martins. The play was inspired by Ionesco’s attempt to learn English, and the dialogue is a parody of the kinds of conversations that take place in foreign-language instruction. The couples, eventually joined by the Fire Chief and his lover, who is also the Smiths’ maid, tell stories about their lives.

    The cast includes San Antonio freshman Hannah Marfin as Mrs. Smith; Ferris senior Cameron Ralston as Mr. Smith; Mount Enterprise sophomore Mikayla Whitlow as Mary; Houston junior Johana Lenington as Mrs. Martin; Center sophomore Keaton Watlington as Mr. Martin; and Red Oak senior Sedona McDonald as Fire Chief.

    Stage manager is Valeria De La Cruz, Zacatecas, Mexico, senior; scenic designer is Jenna Alley, Kingwood junior; costume designer is Cairo Pratt, Scurry junior; lighting designer is CaitLyne Martin, Brownsboro junior; and sound designer is Carson Cook, McKinney junior.

    McDearmont is a theatre education major. As an SFA student, she lists her favorite shows with which she has been affiliated as “The Wolves,” in which she acted as assistant director; “Dancing at Lughnasa,” for which she was props master; and “Crimes of the Heart,” in which she acted in the role of Babe.

    Faculty production advisor for “The Bald Soprano” is Rick Jones.

    Tickets are $4. To purchase tickets or virtual access, visit the SFA Fine Arts Box Office online at boxoffice.sfasu.edu or call (936) 468-6407. Box office sales end at 4 p.m. on Oct. 30. For more information about the play, call the School of Theatre at (936) 468-4003 or visit theatre.sfasu.edu.

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  • SFA music composition students collaborate with game development powerhouse

    SFA music composition students collaborate with game development powerhouse

    October 15, 2020—Robbie Goodrich

    A collaborative relationship between the Stephen F. Austin State University School of Music and Southern Methodist University’s Guildhall game development program is paving the way for SFA music/composition students to be highly successful in the lucrative video game industry.

    Three SFA students are teaming up with a cohort of graduate students at Guildhall to work on a project that will give them valuable real-world experience and put them in the forefront of the industry that scores music and creates sound design for video games.

    The project includes students Caleb Guevara, a senior composition major from Houston; Daniel Cooper, distance graduate student majoring in theory-composition from Hilton, New York; and Travis Wattigney, recently-graduated composition major from Fort Worth who was also a College of Fine Arts Dean’s Circle award winner in music.

    The collaboration came about through the efforts of Mason Lieberman, SFA music composition graduate and an adjunct music instructor for SFA, and Dr. Stephen Lias, professor of composition in the School of Music. SFA has been working to build its capacity to train composers to score video games over the past few years, and that goal is being met largely due to Lieberman, according to Lias. Lieberman developed specialized classes for SFA and teaches them remotely from California where he works as senior game audio specialist for Tencent, which is considered to be the world’s largest video game vendor.

    “A year ago, Mason and I met with the folks at SMU’s Guildhall game development program about the possibility of our students teaming up with their game development teams,” Lias said. “Guildhall is a powerhouse program with deep industry partnerships and international reputation, so our goal was to create a pipeline for our students to work with theirs once Mason’s classes give them the necessary preparation.”

    The Guildhall was established in 2003 as a premier graduate-level video game development education program in the United States. It was created at the request of the game development industry to train its future leaders, according to information at smu.edu/Guildhall.

    As the senior game audio coordinator for Tencent in the U.S., Lieberman solves audio problems and helps manage the department in pursuit of various company goals to “make sure we’re creating the best music, sound and voice-over possible,” he said. His duties can range from hiring special guest artists for projects and managing studio sessions to designing recording studio facilities and negotiating licensing deals, among many other responsibilities.

    “All of this occurs against the backdrop of the largest company in all of game development,” he added.

    It was always Lieberman’s goal to work in video games. He scored his first game, a tiny mobile title called “Bounce the Block,” as a freshman at SFA. The students involved in the Guildhall project are like-minded.

    “As a participant of this project, I am most looking forward to seeing the final product, and that’s a game with which I helped come to life by adding my touch through music,” Guevara said. “This type of project will more than help me stand out to companies who are looking for composers/sound designers.

    “Because of my young age, having this kind of experience will beef up my arsenal of music that I can offer,” he said. “Video game scoring has always been a fascination of mine. One of my earliest memories is waking up early to plug-in my new GameCube that I had gotten for Christmas so that I could start playing. Staying up and just listening to the score of whatever game I was playing was a huge part of my childhood. This project is helping to me into a career that will certainly make me feel like a kid again.”

    Cooper said he is looking forward to the “game development team environment.”

    “I think having our compositions written and heard is the obvious thing composers are excited for, but outside of that, the team environment is most exciting for me,” he said. “This lets us experience the ‘real world’ of game development, and this project lines up with my career plans entirely.”

    Cooper’s earliest influences with music came from playing video games and watching movies.

    “As a kid, I think that I knew more themes from the games that I played than the popular songs on the radio,” he said. “Being able to create adaptive music that reacts with a player is such a cool experience. You have to think through every possibility that a player may encounter in a game and then ask yourself how you can encapsulate all the emotions of those moments. The uncertainty of when each change may occur and being able to write for that level of adaptability is a fun challenge! Soundtracks can make or break any moment of a game or film; accepting that responsibility is a true honor for me.”

    According to Lieberman, the collaboration between SFA and SMU sets these and future composition students on the path for rewarding careers in game development. The video game industry currently makes about twice as much money as the film/TV/traditional global music industries combined, he said. The courses Lieberman now teaches for SFA were developed as part of his thesis upon completing his master’s degree at Berklee College of Music.

    “My courses go straight to the heart of what it takes to become a working professional in this field,” he said. “I want my students to walk out with a firm understanding of what the real game industry is like, with a demo reel ready to go, and clearly-defined skills that will serve them well both in securing their first jobs and for years after as they begin to find their places professionally.”

    Lieberman described the game development as “an innately-collaborative field.”

    “It is very rare to find a major title produced only by one person,” he said. “In AAA development, teams can be in the hundreds or even thousands. Every opportunity for our students to collaborate with others is a chance to build the sort of fraternal bonds that can lead to professional development, that first gig, or even emotional growth. I think the ability to collaborate with others is perhaps the most important skill in professional music-making, and it can sometimes be one we don’t address very directly. My hope is that these types of partnerships can set a standard for how we at SFA look to teach students to reach their potentials.”

    Lias said he is “exceptionally proud” of the SFA students involved in the Guildhall project.

    “I know they’ll do an excellent job on the project, but I’m also very happy to see us establish this collaborative relationship with Guildhall and eager to see it grow in future semesters,” he said. “Deepest thanks to Mason for the exceptional investment he makes in our students and for helping make our composition program more relevant.”

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  • SFA Symphony Orchestra concert canceled

    SFA Symphony Orchestra concert canceled

    October 14, 2020—Robbie Goodrich

    The Stephen F. Austin State University Symphony Orchestra’s virtual performance scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 20, has been canceled.

    Program selections for this concert will be moved to future performances.

    For additional information, contact the School of Music at (936) 468-4602.

    You may also be interested in the following related article:

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  • SFA presents “Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead” through Saturday

    SFA presents “Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead” through Saturday

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    October 9, 2020—Robbie Goodrich

    Stephen F. Austin State University theatre students Crayten Clendion, senior from Cypress, and Ryleigh Compton, junior from Terrell, are among the cast members in the School of Theatre’s presentation of Bert V. Royal’s “Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead” playing at 7:30 nightly through Saturday, Oct. 10, in Kennedy Auditorium on the SFA campus. The show is also livestreamed. The play is recommended for mature audiences. General ticket prices are: adult, $15; senior (62+), $10; non-SFA student, $10; SFA faculty/staff, $7.50; youth, $7.50; SFA student, $5; virtual access, $15. Live virtual access is available for all performances. Purchase tickets/access at http://www.boxoffice.sfasu.edu or call (936) 468-6407. For questions about the play, contact the School of Theatre at (936) 468-4003.

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  • SFA School of Art to host ‘Oil and Water,’ faculty exhibitions

    SFA School of Art to host ‘Oil and Water,’ faculty exhibitions

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    Works by SFA art professor Amanda Breitbach are featured in “Oil and Water,” a photography exhibition showing in Cole Art Center Oct. 22 through Dec. 31. An SFA art faculty exhibition will show at the same time.

    October 7, 2020—Robbie Goodrich

    The Stephen F. Austin State University School of Art will present exhibitions that showcase the works of its faculty members in shows planned for Oct. 22 through Dec. 31 in The Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House.

    “Oil and Water” features photographs taken along the Texas Gulf Coast by Amanda Breitbach, assistant professor of art at SFA.

    “These photographs represent the dual nature of the Texas Gulf Coast as an important ecosystem that provides vital habitat for wildlife and a site of oil and gas development that is equally vital to the global petrochemical industry,” Breitbach said.

    Breitbach grew up on a family farm and ranch in eastern Montana. She studied photography and French at Montana State University before serving as an agroforestry volunteer with the United States Peace Corps in Guinea, West Africa. She has worked as a newspaper photographer, writer and editor as well as a freelance photographer. She earned a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2016.

    The Breitbach show will be in the upstairs Reavley Gallery while an exhibition in the downstairs Ledbetter Gallery will feature works by other SFA art faculty members.

    Art exhibitions are sponsored in part by William Arscott, the Friends of the Visual Arts and the Nacogdoches Junior Forum.

    The Cole Art Center is SFA’s historic downtown art gallery located at 329 E. Main St. For more information, call the School of Art at (936) 468-4804. Admission is free.

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  • SFA Chamber Singers to perform Whitacre’s ‘Five Hebrew Love Songs’

    SFA Chamber Singers to perform Whitacre’s ‘Five Hebrew Love Songs’

    October 6, 2020—Robbie Goodrich

    The Chamber Singers at Stephen F. Austin State University will present a virtual concert entitled “Sojourn: An Evening of Sonnets, Spirituals and Love” when the ensemble performs at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 13.

    “The choral works presented on this concert represent a diverse repertoire of both festive, soulful and intimate sounds that will free the mind from the world for an evening,” according to Dr. Michael Murphy, director of choral activities in the SFA School of Music.

    Works by American, British and Italian composers will be featured. The program includes music and/or arrangements by Williametta Spencer, Vittoria Aleotti, Undine S. Moore, L.L. Fleming, Stephen Paulus and more. A highlight of the concert will be a performance of Eric Whitacre’s “Five Hebrew Love Songs” with violin and piano.

    The concert will also showcase Dr. Jennifer Dalmas, professor of violin at SFA; graduate student conductor and pianist Greg Simmons of Tyler; and graduate conductor David Zielke of Albany, Oregon.

    Obtain free access to the online, live-streamed concert by visiting music.sfasu.edu on the night of the performance. For more information about the School of Music, contact (936) 468-4602.

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  • SFA Symphony Orchestra to perform works by Tchaikovsky, Milhaud

    SFA Symphony Orchestra to perform works by Tchaikovsky, Milhaud

    October 6, 2020—Robbie Goodrich

    The Stephen F. Austin State University Symphony Orchestra’s virtual performance on Tuesday, Oct. 20, will feature music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky and Darius Milhaud.

    Beginning at 7:30 p.m. and accessible through live streaming free of charge at music.sfasu.edu, the concert’s main feature is Tchaikovsky’s “Serenade for Strings,” according to Dr. Gregory Grabowski, the orchestra’s conductor.

    “The Tchaikovsky (piece) is one of the biggest standards of string repertoire,” Grabowski said.

    The concert also includes French composer Milhaud’s “La Creation du Monde.”

    “The Milhaud was composed in the 1920s and was very much influenced by early jazz,” Grabowski said. “Apparently, when he heard his first American jazz band perform in London, Milhaud was so captivated he went to New York City to visit Harlem, go to jazz clubs and mingle with jazz musicians.

    “Interestingly – and honestly accidentally – both pieces fit at home in the ballet,” Grabowski added. “The Milhaud was originally composed as a ballet, and George Balanchine (ballet choreographer) brought the Tchaikovsky into the ballet repertoire.”

    The concert will be live-streamed only with a rebroadcast at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 27, on the SFA Symphony Orchestra YouTube page. For additional information, contact the School of Music at (936) 468-4602.

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  • SFA art faculty Edmondson to present lecture

    SFA art faculty Edmondson to present lecture

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    Greg Edmonson will present a virtual art lecture, “A Nasty Bruise and a Jagged Scar: Five Years as an Artist-in-Residence,” at 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 19, accessible through Zoom registration at cn.edu/zoomgreg.

    October 5, 2020—Robbie Goodrich

    Artist Greg Edmondson, a new adjunct faculty member in the School of Art at Stephen F. Austin State University, will present a virtual lecture at 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 19, that will be accessible through Zoom registration at cn.edu/zoomgreg.

    Edmondson will present “A Nasty Bruise and a Jagged Scar: Five Years as an Artist-in-Residence” in which he will discuss his experiences with four residency programs. During that time, he had two books of paintings published. Edmondson was a visiting artist at SFA in 2018, and two paintings started as demonstrations during that time for Wesley Berg’s expressive drawing seminar were included in the published collections.

    His lecture will feature a discussion about the books, works that came after those publications, and information about his current project, “Dark Matter,” which includes a collaboration with physicist and poet Agnes Vojta.

    Edmondson earned a B.F.A. from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville and an M.F.A. from Washington University in St. Louis. He is the recipient of numerous grants and awards including a Fulbright Scholarship, fellowships to Germany and residency fellowships to the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Black Mountain College, the Santa Fe Art Institute and Kuenstlerwerkstatt Lothringerstrasse, among others. His first book of paintings, “Rivers and Beasts,” was published by Spartan Press in 2017. His second book, “After the Flood,” was published by Stubborn Mule Press in 2019. Edmondson has exhibited widely throughout the U.S. and Europe. Recent solo exhibitions include “Sisyphus Calls It Quits” in the The Smalter Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri, and “Living Like Animals – Paintings from a truly wild place” at Columbia College, Columbia, Missouri. His collaboration with Vojta will be exhibited at The Smalter Gallery in 2021.

    Edmondson is presenting the lecture for the Appalachian Cultural Center at Carson-Newman University, a private liberal arts university in Jefferson City, Tennessee.

    He may be reached at http://www.gregedmondson.net or voegel60@gmail.com. For more information, contact the School of Art at (936) 468-4804.

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  • SFA A Cappella Choir to perform new music written in response to pandemic

    SFA A Cappella Choir to perform new music written in response to pandemic

    October 5, 2020—Robbie Goodrich

    The A Cappella Choir at Stephen F. Austin State University will present a virtual concert entitled “Autumn Splendor and Solemn Ritual” when the ensemble performs at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 18.

    The choir will perform works by composers from Slovenia, Germany, Italy and Norway, along with new music written in response to the COVID pandemic, according to Dr. Michael Murphy, director of choral activities in the SFA School of Music.

    “The choral works represented on this concert are inspired from festive and solemn rituals composed from the 18th century to just a couple of weeks ago,” Murphy said.

    The choir will dedicate “In Remembrance” by American composer Jeffery Ames “to all those who have lost their lives to COVID-19,” Murphy said. Dr. Charles Gavin, professor of horn at SFA, will join the choir for the tribute.

    American composer Dan Forrest asked the choir to premiere his newest composition, “fermata,” that speaks of those who had to suspend performing because of the pandemic. The word ‘fermata” is Italian in origin and means a pause of unspecified length on a note or rest.

    Other works on the program include music and/or arrangements by Damijan Močnik, J.S. Bach, Johannes Brahms, Ildebrando Pizzetti and more.

    The concert will also feature graduate student conductors Greg Simmons of Tyler and David Zielke of Albany, Oregon. Dr. Ron Petti, professor and director of collaborative piano, will accompany.

    Obtain free access to the online, live-streamed concert by visiting music.sfasu.edu on the night of the performance. For more information about the School of Music, contact (936) 468-4602.

    You may also be interested in the following related article:

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  • SFA theatre: Preparing for live performance in COVID era offers lessons in reality

    SFA theatre: Preparing for live performance in COVID era offers lessons in reality

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    Cushing theatre student Drake Willis and fellow “Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead” castmates at Stephen F. Austin State University rehearse a scene from the School of Theatre’s Mainstage show that runs Oct. 6 through 10 in Kennedy Auditorium on the SFA campus. The show will also be live streamed.

    October 5, 2020—Robbie Goodrich

    Theatre students at Stephen F. Austin State University have prepared for their presentation of “Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead” in ways they have never experienced, even for the most seasoned actors and crew members.

    With the world still in the throes of the COVID pandemic, all students – from freshmen to seniors – are taking extra precautions to keep each other safe while still trying to connect with their acting partners on stage, according to Crayten Clendion, senior from Cypress who has acted in numerous Mainstage plays at SFA.

    “It’s different from previous years – from stage management to the cast,” she said.

    Safety for actors and crew used to mean creating the stage scenic environment in a safe manner and keeping physical safety in mind while choreographing and blocking for a show. Today, the connotation of safety takes on a more earnest meaning, said Cleo House Jr., director of the School of Theatre and of the play.

    “Like everyone, I’m processing what we’re living through on multiple levels,” House said. “Naturally, safety is a concern, but also of concern is our students’ development as artists. I think moving on with doing shows live has provided a sense of normalcy and stability. Rehearsing a show is partly about building community and ensemble. We’re in a time where many communities, for good reason, are fractured or don’t exist. Participating in this process is as much as much about preserving mental health of those who need to be around others as it is about serving our students pedagogically.”

    Bert V. Royal’s “Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead” is a play about a teenage boy, CB, who begins to question the existence of an afterlife after his dog dies. The School of Theatre will present the show at 7:30 nightly Oct. 6 through 10 in Kennedy Auditorium on campus. It will also be live streamed.

    Freshman Astrid Maldonado of Katy is new to collegiate performing, and her indoctrination to the Mainstage Series comes with wearing a mask.

    “That’s what has challenged me the most – getting used to acting with a mask on and remembering to be aware of things I've never had to worry about before,” she said. “Covid-19, plus being in my first Mainstage at SFA, has been such a new experience, and I'm learning new things and trying to adjust to this environment. Everyone I have met and worked with has been a huge help in getting me accustomed.”

    Despite the mask requirement, Maldonado still feels connected to her castmates.

    “I’m grateful to be a part of my first Mainstage with such hardworking and talented people I can learn from,” she said. “Something that's surprised me is how fast the rehearsal process seemed to fly by. It feels like so much has happened in such a short amount of time.”

    For Houston junior Nychollete Easter, assistant director of the play, a difference in directing today and directing pre-COVID is “a lot less face-to-face contact and staging.”

    “We have to make sure that the actors are safe, but also that the show still looks good and not awkward,” she said. “There’s a lot of reworking scenes to adjust to a safety precaution that needs to be considered. Overall, there is just a bit more to consider this year.”

    Regardless of the rehearsal circumstances, Easter hopes the audience, both in person and virtually, “gets the real-life aspects of the show.”

    “The events that take place in the show are problems that are happening every day to teenagers all over the world,” Easter said. “These things are real problems that a lot of older adults don't see happen or choose to ignore. This show is very good at showing how grief affects a person no matter how popular or good looking they are. This show is meant to make people uncomfortable, because usually when people get uncomfortable, they want to change the thing that made them uncomfortable. I want the audience to want to bring about change so that issues like the ones discussed in the show are addressed.”

    Clendion believes that the new lessons she is learning about preparing for a stage role in the midst of a pandemic will bode her well as she seeks employment post-graduation.

    “The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is like a pre-professional program that teaches you how to be successful in the professional world of theatre,” she said. “My professors have supported and guided me so that I understand what life is like after graduation. They have shown me the tools that I will need in order to be successful.”

    House said “Dog Sees God” is for mature audiences and would likely be rated R in movie terms, mostly due to language and subject matter.

    Because of social distancing requirements, seating in Kennedy Auditorium will be limited for each performance. Patrons are required to wear face coverings. Actors on stage will not wear masks during live performances. However, performance areas are more than six feet away from patron seating.

    General ticket prices are: adult, $15; senior (62+), $10; non-SFA student, $10; SFA faculty/staff, $7.50; youth, $7.50; SFA student, $5; virtual access, $15. Live virtual access is available for all performances. Purchase tickets/access at boxoffice.sfasu.edu or call (936) 468-6407. For questions about the play, contact the School of Theatre at (936) 468-4003.

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