College of Fine Arts News Archive

January 2018

  • SFA's University Series remembers loss of King with 'The Mountaintop'

    SFA's University Series remembers loss of King with 'The Mountaintop'

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    The College of Fine Arts and the Office of Multicultural Affairs at Stephen F. Austin State University, along with L.A. Theatre Works, will anticipate the 50th anniversary of the death of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with a touring presentation of the internationally acclaimed play “The Mountaintop,” written by Katori Hall and directed by multiple award-winner Shirley Jo Finney. The performance is part of the College of Fine Arts’ University Series and will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 3, in W.M. Turner Auditorium on the SFA campus.

    January 18, 2018—Robbie Goodrich

    In 2018, America and the world will mark the 50th anniversary of the death of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

    The College of Fine Arts and the Office of Multicultural Affairs at Stephen F. Austin State University, along with L.A. Theatre Works, will anticipate the anniversary with a touring presentation of the internationally acclaimed play "The Mountaintop," written by Katori Hall and directed by multiple award-winner Shirley Jo Finney.

    The performance is part of the College of Fine Arts' University Series and will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 3, in W.M. Turner Auditorium on the SFA campus.

    "This play takes us back, not to the idealism of 'I have a dream,' but to the contentious racial and class issues, the questions of conflict and social justice that led to Dr. King's murder, and that still haunt America," said Scott Shattuck, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts and director of the University Series. "It does so in fanciful and even shocking ways that no audience member would anticipate.

    "We are grateful to present this controversial play in association with SFA's Office of Multicultural Affairs under the leadership of Veronica Beavers," Shattuck continued. "As Black History Month begins, we hope that this performance will stimulate important dialogue among students and other audience members that may not have attended University Series events in the past."

    On the evening of April 4, 1968, less than 24 hours after his famed "I've been to the mountaintop" speech, Martin Luther King Jr. was murdered outside Room 306 of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. In "The Mountaintop," Hall fantasizes an unexpected conversation inside that room on the night before the assassination.

    Recipient of London's 2010 Olivier Award for Best New Play, Hall's gripping re-imagining of events is "rife with humanity and humor as the great civil rights leader reveals his hopes, regrets and fears to a motel housekeeper that seems inconsequential, at first, to his destiny," according to Shattuck.

    "It was really important for me to show the human side of King," playwright Hall said. "During this time, he was dealing with the heightened threat of violence, he was tackling issues beyond civil rights - economic issues - and was denouncing the Vietnam War. So I wanted to explore the emotional toll and the stress of that. King changed the world, but he was not a deity. He was a man, a human being, like me and you. So it was important to show him as such: vulnerable."

    "The Mountaintop" stars Gilbert Glenn Brown (CBS TV's "The Inspectors," upcoming feature film "The Best of Enemies") and Karen Malina White ("The Cosby Show," "A Different World," "Malcolm and Eddie"). The production will travel to 38 cities across the United States. "The Mountaintop" contains mature language and controversial themes.

    For three decades, L.A. Theatre Works has been the leading radio theater company in the United States, committed to using innovative technologies to preserve and promote significant works of dramatic literature and bringing live theater into the homes of millions. The company's public radio series, featuring stage plays performed by America's top actors augmented by interviews with the artists and others, can be heard on public radio stations across the U.S. The producing director is Susan Albert Loewenberg.

    L.A. Theatre Works' national touring program brings audiences at venues across the country the experience of a "live-in-performance" radio drama. Since 2005, L.A. Theatre Works has visited over 300 civic, performing arts and university venues. They last visited the SFA campus with "Dracula" in 2016.

    Prior to the performance, Cleo House, director of the SFA School of Theatre, will present an informative talk at 7 p.m. in Griffith Gallery. The gallery is located across the hall from Turner Auditorium, which is inside the Griffith Fine Arts Building, 2222 Alumni Drive.

    Single event ticket prices for the University Series are $25 for adults, $20 for seniors and $10 for non-SFA students/youth. Tickets for SFA students are $3.

    For more information, visit finearts.sfasu.edu, stop by the Fine Arts Box Office in Room 211 of the Griffith Fine Arts Building, or call (936) 468-6407 or (888) 240-ARTS.

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  • SFA theatre students, faculty to participate in national Ghostlight Project

    SFA theatre students, faculty to participate in national Ghostlight Project

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    The School of Theatre at Stephen F. Austin State University will join hundreds of other theatre communities across the nation on Friday, Jan. 19, by participating in The Ghostlight Project.

    January 17, 2018—Robbie Goodrich

    The School of Theatre at Stephen F. Austin State University will join hundreds of other theatre communities across the nation - from Broadway to regional theaters to high schools and colleges and community theaters - on Friday, Jan. 19, by participating in The Ghostlight Project.

    Inspired by the tradition of leaving a "ghost light" on in a darkened theatre, artists and communities will make or renew a pledge to stand for and protect the values of inclusion, participation and compassion for everyone - regardless of race, class, religion, country of origin, immigration status, (dis)ability, gender identity or sexual orientation, according to information at theghostlightproject.com.

    Gathering at 5:30 p.m. on and around the veranda of Griffith Fine Arts Building on the SFA campus, participants will join in a collective, simultaneous action, literally and figuratively bringing light to the darkness, according to Dr. Rick Jones, professor of theatre.

    Jones explains that, "This is about respecting and valuing those who are different from us in terms of demographic profile, but it's also about extending that same concern for those who disagree with us philosophically or politically.

    "As theatre people, we understand that you don't have to be a monarchist to appreciate Racine, or a Communist to appreciate Brecht, or a Hindu to appreciate Kalidasa," he said. "But sometimes it's harder to translate that into our everyday lives."

    The public, especially but not exclusively members of the arts community, is invited to attend. Attendees should bring a light that can be readily turned on and off - a cell phone flashlight, regular flashlight, glow stick, etc. Promptly at 5:30, all will light their lights together in a show of solidarity, Jones said.

    Started last year, the national project aims to continue creating brave spaces that will serve as lights in the coming years, and to build a network of people across the country working to support vulnerable communities.

    Visit theghostlightproject.com for more information. Locally, contact the School of Theatre at (936) 468-4003.

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  • SFA Wind Ensemble to perform TMEA preview concert

    SFA Wind Ensemble to perform TMEA preview concert

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    The Wind Ensemble at SFA will perform a preview of its TMEA program in a concert at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 30, in W.M. Turner Auditorium on the university campus.

    January 17, 2018—Robbie Goodrich

    Music the Stephen F. Austin State University Wind Ensemble will perform at this year's Texas Music Educators Association convention will be presented in a concert at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 30, in W.M. Turner Auditorium on the SFA campus.

    "This concert is a preview of pieces we will perform at the TMEA convention in San Antonio in February," said Fred J. Allen, director of bands.

    "The SFA Wind Ensemble was selected to perform at the convention following a competitive round of adjudicated recordings last April," Allen said. "We are proud to represent SFA before this large gathering of music educators."

    There are two main works in the program, according to Allen. "Angel of Mercy" by David Maslanka fuses three chorales harmonized by Johann Sebastian Bach 400 years ago.

    "The performance will also be a tribute to Maslanka, who died in August 2017," Allen said.

    Another large-scale work is the first movement of the "Symphony No. 2" by the American composer Howard Hanson.

    "I received permission from the Eastman School of Music to transcribe this movement for concert band," Allen said. "It is a beautiful work from 1930 by one of this country's most romantic composers."

    David Campo, associate director of bands, will conduct "American Salute" by Morton Gould, and Tamey Anglley, assistant director of bands, will conduct "Saisei Fanfare" by Brett William Dietz. The band will also play a march by Franz von Blon.

    Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

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  • Tubman's bravery showcased in SFA's Children's Performing Arts Series

    Tubman's bravery showcased in SFA's Children's Performing Arts Series

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    Two performances of “Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad” on Thursday, Feb. 1, at Stephen F. Austin State University will usher in local observances of Black History Month in February.

    January 12, 2018—Robbie Goodrich

    The Children's Performing Arts Series at Stephen F. Austin State University will celebrate Black History Month Thursday, Feb. 1, with performances of the Virginia Repertory Theatre's "Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad."

    This stirring drama with music is a classic tribute to the great American who freed herself and hundreds of her people from the bonds of slavery, according to Diane Peterson, SFA Fine Arts Box Office manager and director of the College of Fine Art's children's series.

    "Traveling by night and in extreme secrecy, Harriet Tubman's courage helped to change the world," Peterson said.

    Audiences will learn of Tubman's inspiring and adventurous life in this factual and deeply moving musical history lesson, written for children in second through eighth grade.

    As the story unfolds, children will learn of Tubman's early years in slavery, her escape to freedom, and her time as a conductor on the Underground Railroad. During the Civil War, Tubman becomes a spy for the Union Army, and later a nurse and scout. The North wins the war bringing emancipation to the slaves but that does not end Tubman's struggle for freedom. She turns her attention to women's suffrage and continues fighting for everyone who suffers inequality.

    Teachers can incorporate this show into their curriculum with reading materials and activities outlined at http://va-rep.org/tour/guides/harriet.pdf.

    Other upcoming CPAS performances are Super Scientific Circus on Wednesday, March 7; and "The Ugly Duckling" on Friday, April 27.

    Performances are at 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. on show dates in W.M. Turner Auditorium on the SFA campus. Tickets are $7.50 for individuals and $6 per person for groups of 20 or more.

    To order tickets, call (936) 468-6407 or (888) 240-ARTS. Visit the CPAS website at http://www.cpas.sfasu.edu/ for additional information.

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  • Mixed media featured in 'Junko Chodos: Can We Hear Our Own Voice?'

    Mixed media featured in 'Junko Chodos: Can We Hear Our Own Voice?'

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    “Junko Chodos: Can We Hear Our Own Voice?” features mixed media pieces and drawings and will show from Jan. 25 through March 25 in The Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House. A reception with the artist is from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 27.

    January 12, 2018—Robbie Goodrich

    The Stephen F. Austin State University College of Fine Arts and School of Art will present an exhibition of works by contemporary artist Junko Chodos showing Jan. 24 through March 25 in The Cole Art Center @ The Old Opera House in downtown Nacogdoches.

    "Junko Chodos: Can We Hear Our Own Voice?" features mixed media pieces and drawings. The artist considers herself "a hypermodern mystic," and she describes much of her work as "centripetal" in nature.

    "It refers to art created by an artist who strives towards her center and encounters 'Divine Presence' there, where people go beyond the barriers of ethnicity, gender, religious denominations, dogma, and confined ideas of blood and soil," she writes. "For such an artist, the process of creating art itself is a spiritual journey on which every step must be taken with honesty, with discipline and with courage.

    "When the artist's journey is successful, the viewer participates in it and starts out on his or her own journey," she said. "Then the process of creating art and the process of viewing art becomes one, and the transcendence that the artist reaches becomes the viewer's own transcendence."

    Her large-scale pieces are titled "Lift the Curtain Series."

    "These pieces deal with the boundary between the outer world and the inner world," she said. "As their title implies, they require us to have the courage to look behind the curtain which we take for granted as something that separates these two worlds.

    "The images of this series came to me as strong demands," she said. "It can be said that they came as a Revelation, or if you feel more comfortable using (Carl) Jung's words, they came from the collective unconscious - from a place far deeper than the personal unconscious. They came as a shock to me: they flooded onto me, they made me sway, one image after another continuing through all the works in that series, demanding my response."

    John Handley, director of SFA Art Galleries, first encountered Junko's work while he was at The University of California, Berkley. He said he was immediately attracted to it on many levels: "the abstraction, expressiveness and immediacy of the work, touching on emotional turmoil, hope, fear, spirituality and transcendence."

    "I've continued to watch her career and was really taken by the body of work selected for this exhibition," he said. "This is not your typical art; it embodies so much about the artist's life and journey, and I believe the show will inspire artists from all media to think in broader terms about creativity."

    This is the first public exhibition in which these works are being displayed. However many of the artist's friends - composers and other artists - have come to her studio to see them and have said that they could not stop crying, and that they consider these works to be "an important message to our generation," she said.

    The artist will discuss her work, specifically where her art fits into the course of art history, at a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 27, at Cole Art Center. The reception is sponsored in part by the Friends of the Visual Arts, Nacogdoches Junior Forum and The Flower Shop.

    Junko Takahashi was born in 1939 in Tokyo, Japan. Her experience during World War II affected her later in life and in her art. She grew up in a household where Shinto, Buddhism and Christianity were strong influences. She was a member of the first post-war generation of "commoners" allowed to attend the prestigious Gakushuin, the "Imperial school."

    She enrolled at Tokyo's Waseda University, graduating in 1968 with a bachelor's degree in art history and philosophy. In 1968, she migrated to California, calling herself a "spiritual refugee." She attended the State University of New York, Buffalo. In 1971, she married Rafael Chodos, a lawyer and author in biblical studies and the aesthetics of fine art.

    She has been creating art professionally since the early 1970s and has produced more than 1,000 works in a variety of media and techniques, many of which she invented.

    For more information, call (936) 468-1131.

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  • Local fans look forward to Chanticleer's performance

    Local fans look forward to Chanticleer's performance

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    The Grammy Award-winning Chanticleer a cappella choir will perform at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 19, in W.M. Turner Auditorium on the SFA campus.

    January 11, 2018—Robbie Goodrich

    Brisk ticket sales to the University Series performance of the Grammy Award-winning men's chorus Chanticleer a cappella choir at Stephen F. Austin State University may be reflective of the wide fan base the popular a cappella choir enjoys worldwide.

    The SFA College of Fine Arts will present Chanticleer performing the program "Heart of a Soldier" at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 19, in W.M. Turner Auditorium on the SFA campus.

    Known around the globe as "an orchestra of voices," the San Francisco-based ensemble is famous for the seamless blend of its 12 male voices, ranging from soprano to bass, and its original interpretations of songs, from Renaissance to jazz and from gospel to pop, according to Scott Shattuck, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts and director of the University Series.

    Local fans are eagerly anticipating the performance, and one of those is John Handley, director of SFA Art Galleries.

    "I learned about the group when I was living in the Bay Area," Handley said. "I purchased a couple of their CDs, one of which was a Christmas album. I have never seen a live performance, so I am very eager to experience their music 'first hand.'

    "When people think of a cappella singing (no musical instruments), one is tempted to think of so-called 'barbershop' music," Handley added. "Chanticleer is nothing of the sort; the singing is so melodious that you can easily forget that there is no musical accompaniment."

    Called "the world's reigning male chorus" by the New Yorker magazine, Chanticleer will celebrate its 40th anniversary in 2018. During its 2017-18 season. Chanticleer will perform 52 concerts in 23 of the United States, 27 in the San Francisco Bay Area, and eight in Poland, Germany, France and Spain.

    Dr. Michael Murphy, director of choral activities for the SFA School of Music, has been a Chanticleer fan for many years.

    "I have been a Chanticleer fan as long as I can remember - definitely since my years as an undergraduate student in North Carolina," Murphy said. "I have been inspired by Chanticleer concerts many times, most recently in 2012."

    Their music will appeal to a wide audience, according to both Handley and Murphy.

    "I think this performance is ideal for families," Handley said. "People of all ages will enjoy it."

    "The appeal to me is that they sing a wide array of choral music exquisitely," Murphy said. "The commitment and professionalism to the choral craft and the skill level and sincerity in which they perform are the reasons I attribute to their success as world-class artists since 1978."

    Murphy said he was excited to learn that the program features music that focuses on the universal theme of a soldier's heart.

    "From the serene, but elegant setting of 'O Pray for the Peace of Jerusalem' of Welsh-born, English Renaissance master Thomas Tomkins, to the rousing and toe-tapping 1957 hit 'Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy' by The Andrews Sisters, there is something for everyone to enjoy and relate to," Murphy said.

    "I am excited for our community to witness this world-class vocal ensemble that is certainly a cultural gem in our American music scene," he added.

    Prior to the performance, Murphy will present an informative talk at 7 p.m. in Griffith Gallery. The gallery is located across the hall from Turner Auditorium, which is inside the Griffith Fine Arts Building, 2222 Alumni Drive.

    The Nacogdoches performance is sponsored in part by BancorpSouth.

    Single event ticket prices for the University Series are $25 for adults, $20 for seniors and $10 for non-SFA students/youth. Tickets for SFA students are $3.

    For more information, visit finearts.sfasu.edu, stop by the Fine Arts Box Office in Room 211 of the Griffith Fine Arts Building, or call (936) 468-6407 or (888) 240-ARTS.

    Details about this concert program and the artists can be accessed at:

    http://finearts.sfasu.edu/media/pdf/ChanticleerTextsTranslations.pdf
    http://finearts.sfasu.edu/media/pdf/ChanticleerFactSheet.pdf
    http://finearts.sfasu.edu/media/pdf/ChanticleerSingerBios.pdf
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  • SFA's Music Prep to offer new early childhood music classes

    SFA's Music Prep to offer new early childhood music classes

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    The Music Preparatory Division of the School of Music at Stephen F. Austin State University is introducing early childhood music classes as part of the spring lineup of educational offerings. Dr. Kristin Lyman, coordinator of music education for the SFA School of Music, will lead the classes beginning Tuesday, Jan. 30, at the Music Prep House at 3028 Raguet St.

    January 11, 2018—Robbie Goodrich

    The Music Preparatory Division of the School of Music at Stephen F. Austin State University is introducing early childhood music classes as part of the spring lineup of educational offerings.

    Dr. Kristin Lyman, coordinator of music education for the SFA School of Music, will lead the classes beginning Tuesday, Jan. 30, at the Music Prep House at 3028 Raguet St.

    Three different 30-minute class offerings twice a week on Tuesday and Thursday mornings will be geared toward young children based on both age and development, according to Pat Barnett, director of the Music Preparatory Division. The classes utilize resources from John Feierabend's "First Steps in Music." Each class meets for 12 weeks.

    "This is an exciting new offering for the children in the community to experience music and learning," Barnett said, "and we highly recommend it."

    "Exploring Bounces, Wiggles and Tickles" for newborns to 18 months is designed to help nurture and develop the minds and skills of infants. The class uses developmentally appropriate activities, including performing songs or rhymes with bounces, wiggles, tickles and lullabies. Repertoire selections will be primarily drawn from folk songs, rhymes and classical music. The class meets from 9 to 9:30 a.m. and costs $200.

    "Exploring Bounces, Clapping, Tapping and Simple Songs" for children 18 months to 3 years is designed to help develop the minds and skills of toddlers. The class uses developmentally appropriate activities, including performing songs or rhymes with bounces, wiggles, tickles, clapping and tapping. Children will learn simple songs and lullabies. Repertoire selections will be primarily drawn from folk songs, rhymes and classical music. The class meets from 9:45 to 10:15 a.m. and costs $225.

    "Exploring Songs, Beat and Movement" for 3- to 5 year-olds allows children to explore pitch through stories and images, sing simple echo or response patterns and songs, explore movement, move to the beat, and use movement to demonstrate musical structure and expression. Repertoire selections will be primarily drawn from folk songs, rhymes and classical music. The class meets from 10:30 to 11 a.m. and costs $250.

    Registration forms for the 2018 spring semester are available on the Music Prep website at http://www.music.sfasu.edu/prep and are being accepted now. The forms may be downloaded and turned in to the Music Prep office. Contact the Music Prep office at (936) 468-1291 for more information.

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  • Exhibition to feature works of California artist Loran

    Exhibition to feature works of California artist Loran

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    “Roots and Stumps,” a piece by California abstract expressionist artist Erle Loran, is among the works to be exhibited in “Erle Loran (1905-1999): A Modern Artist of the American West,” showing Jan. 18 through April 14 in the Griffith Fine Arts Gallery on the SFA campus.

    January 9, 2018—Robbie Goodrich

    An exhibition of works by Erle Loran will show from Jan. 18 through April 14 in the Griffith Fine Arts Gallery on the campus of Stephen F. Austin State University.

    Loran (1905-1999) was a California abstract expressionist, painter, printmaker, author and teacher. "Erle Loran (1905-1999): A Modern Artist of the American West" will feature a retrospective of more than 60 works in diverse media, including oil paintings, watercolor, gouache, mixed media drawings and charcoal studies.

    "These works show the changing styles that the artist explored over a period of some 60 years," said Dr. David Lewis, professor of art history in the SFA School of Art and curator of the exhibition. "Styles range form Regionalism of the WPA era, semi-abstract landscapes, abstract expressionism, to what might best be called abstract impressionism as well as abstract formalism. Whatever style he worked in, Loran always maintained a high level of sophistication and craftsmanship."

    Loran was a key figure in the so-called "Berkeley School" of modernism in the Bay Area of California, which thrived during the late 1930s through the 1950s. Under Loran's leadership as chair in the early and mid 1950s, the Art Department at Berkeley rapidly gained recognition and was ranked among the top three art schools in the country by the College Art Association.

    The inspiration for the Griffith Gallery show came after Lewis saw an exhibition of WPA era art at the Smithsonian Museum of American Art in Washington, D.C. At the time, Lewis knew Loran as the author of a famous book, "Cézanne's Composition," which was first published in 1943, and remained in print for over 60 years. Lewis had not known of his work as an artist before seeing a landscape in that exhibition.

    "I soon began researching his work and life, and the more I looked at his life and work, the more intrigued I became," he said. "I was surprised to learn that he had won numerous honors and distinctions as an exhibiting artist, and that he had played an instrumental role in negotiating a gift of some 45 paintings by Hans Hofmann for the University of California's permanent art collection - the largest collection of its kind anywhere."

    Lewis explains that Hofmann was a key figure in the Abstract Expressionist movement and is generally acknowledge as the single most influential art teacher of the 20th century. The UC-Berkeley faculty adopted many of Hofmann's ideas in developing its curriculum during the 1930s and 1940s.

    "Of course, I was also taken by the consistent quality of Loran's work," Lewis said, "and I also enjoyed the way he used disguised symbolism, sometimes inspired by the petroglyphic art of ancient Native American cultures of the Southwest and later from designs found in Northwest Coast totem poles and Haida artifacts."

    Beginning in the 1930s and continuing through the 1960s, Loran exhibited in most of the major national competitions and invitational shows of his day, including The Whitney Annual (several times), the Carnegie Annual, The San Paolo International (three times), as well as other major exhibitions held at the Chicago Art Institute, The Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art in New York, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the M.H. de Young Museum in San Francisco, among others.

    A gallery talk will take place starting at 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 1, in the gallery, with Lewis discussing Loran's artwork at about 5:30 p.m. Admission is free.

    The exhibition also features a few example of work by Loran's fellow UC-Berkeley artist John Charles Haley, who is considered the "founder" of the "Berkeley School."

    Gallery talks and receptions are sponsored in part by the SFA Friends of the Visual Arts, Nacogdoches Junior Forum and The Flower Shop.

    For more information, call (936) 468-1131.

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  • SFA's Meyer to present percussion concert

    SFA's Meyer to present percussion concert

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    SFA faculty member Dr. Brad Meyer will perform a recital at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 16, in Cole Concert Hall on the SFA campus.

    January 9, 2018—Robbie Goodrich

    The Stephen F. Austin State University School of Music will present faculty member Dr. Brad Meyer performing a recital at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 16, in Cole Concert Hall on the SFA campus.

    Meyer, director of percussion studies at SFA, will perform "Mourning Dove Sonnet" by Christopher Deane, "Stop Speaking" by Andy Akiho and "Intersection Lines" from Meyer's own composition, "Seven Images for Solo Concert Snare Drum." Other selections to be performed include "Roar" from John Luther Adams' "Mathematics of Resonant Bodies" and "Madera Viento y Metal" by Alejandro Viñao.

    In Deane's "Mourning Dove Sonnet" for vibraphone, the composer requires a performer to employ both standard performance techniques, as well as progressive procedures such as bowing of the bars with bass bows, producing harmonics of certain notes, and bending the pitches of bars, Meyers explained.

    "Seven Images" was composed after Meyer returned from a clinic and performance tour in Slovenia where he visited a modern art museum in Ljubljana.

    "As soon as I entered the museum, I was immediately captivated by several large-scale installations," Meyer said. "These installations stayed in my memory long after I had left Slovenia. Because of my fascination with the museum and its art, I decided to create seven snare drum solos based off of seven of the most memorable installations and pieces of art I witnessed."

    "Stop Speaking" is a contemporary piece for solo snare drum and digital playback. It was commissioned for the 2011 Modern Snare Drum Competition hosted by the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra.

    Viñao used electronic sounds to extend and transform the resonance and timbre of the marimba for "Madera Viento y Metal."

    "The harmonies in 'Madera Viento y Metal' follow not only the logic of the notes and scales on which the piece is based, but are also dictated by the colors and resonances resulting from the interaction between the marimba and the electronics sounds I created for this work," the composer writes. "This interaction is dynamic, changing from moment to moment as the music unfolds."

    The recital is part of the School of Music's Calliope Concert Series.

    Tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and $3 for students and youth. For tickets or more information, call the SFA Fine Arts Box Office at (936) 468-6407 or visit http://www.finearts.sfasu.edu.

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